Contact Applecross SHS

Contact Applecross SHS

Address

Links Road
ARDROSS 6153
Western Australia

Phone

(P)+61 8 9314 9393

 

Important News

Important News

Year 10 Long Tan Award

Sophia Ammali  was presented with the 2017 Applecross Senior High School Year 10 Long Tan Youth Leadership and Teamwork Award at a recent assembly.  Mr Lilleyman, Deputy Principal, nominated Sophia for this prestigious award.  She received a certificate and will also receive $250.

Read more...
Novelists in the Making

As part of the Academic English Extension course for Year 10, each student in either Mrs Moss or Mrs Darling’s class was required to complete an extended piece of writing in the form of a Novella, or a “baby” novel.  From Fantasy to Peanut allergies, Coming of Age stories, Road Journeys, Environm

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Contact Applecross SHS

News

Tune in to Today Tonight on Channel 7 this evening at 6:30pm, the Applecross SHS Specialist Tennis program is featured.

To view the advertisement clip, please go to our Facebook page.

Anaphylaxis -  Reminder to Parents/Guardians

If your child is a known Anaphylaxis risk - please provide an updated ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis completed and signed by your child’s doctor for 2017.

Update the plan (including a photo of your child) when the adrenaline autoinjectors are renewed (usually every 12-18 months). Action Plans are available from www.allergy.org.au There are still quite a few Anaphylaxis diagnosed students that need an updated Ascia Action Plan for this year.

Spine Check

The National Self Detection Program for scoliosis (NSDP) –  2017 reminds us that it is recommended that girls in Years 7 and 9 participate in the NSDP by downloading the Self-Detection Brochure for Scoliosis.  The brochure can be accessed directly via a link on the Scoliosis Australia home page www.scoliosis-australia.org.  Parents can download a scoliosis self-detection brochure from this link.

Scoliosis (spinal curvature) is an important health problem for adolescent girls and 25 per thousand are at risk of developing significant spinal curve.  Three girls per thousand require active treatment (a spinal brace or surgery).  In the early stages the condition is most often asymptomatic so screening in the age range 11-14 years is a sound preventive health measure.

Vision check

Vision disorder can markedly affect academic performance, especially for those children who are struggling to learn.  It is recommended that parents take their child to have their eyes examined regularly during their school years, particularly if they have learning difficulties.

School Dental Services

The School Dental Service is a free, public, dental health program available to all children of eligible age, 5 years old and up to the end of Year 11 or 17 years of age, whichever comes first.  The service is funded by the Department of Health.

If your child is already enrolled, you can continue to go to the same centre you attended in primary school or you can contact a new centre that is more convenient.  Please advise the Dental Therapy Centre if you have changed your address so you can be posted a recall appointment.

To find out where the local School Dental Service is located, call 9313 9555 or visit www.dental.wa.gov.au. Students in Year 12 and 17 year olds with a health care card are eligible for general dental care at a Public Dental Clinic.

An after-hours emergency service operates 7 days a week between the hours of 6.30pm-8.00am and can be reached on 9325 3452.  This service is only to be used for immediate and urgent dental treatment.

Raising Children Network

Children are as individual and as different as their parents and making decisions about what’s best for raising children is very personal.

The Raising Children website offers up-to-date, research-based material on more than 800 topics spanning children’s development, behaviour, health, nutrition and fitness, play and learning, connecting and communicating, school and education, entertainment and technology, sleep and safety.

It covers grown-ups, newborns (0-3 months), babies (3-12 months), toddlers (1-3 years), pre-schoolers (3-5 years), school age children (5-9 years), Pre-teens (9-11 years) and early teens (12-15 years).

There are tips, videos and other useful resources.

The Raising Children Network provided information that can help parents with the day to day decisions to do with raising children.  It also provides information to help parents and carers look after their own needs.  The information is based on the best science in parenting, child health and development, presented in language we can all understand.

This is a website for mothers, fathers, grandparents and anyone else who has responsibility for the care of children.  www.raisingchildren.com.au

 

RAISING CHILDREN NETWORK. Sample Information below taken from their website :

Screen time - limit your child’s use of TV and computer games

Children and adolescents should not spend more than two hours a day on screen based activities.  Excessive screen time often leads to poor health, poor fitness and overweight.

Activities like surfing the net, social networking, watching TV and playing screen games can be educational and fun, but all involve sitting still for long periods of time. Set family rules around screen time and encourage your child to try a range of active pastimes. 

For more information, go to http://raisingchildren.net.au

Sleep – tips for teenagers

Teenagers need about 9 -10 hours of sleep a night. Lack of regular sleep is likely to affect academic, sporting performance and behaviour. The risk of emotional problems, such as depression, may also increase in teenagers who regularly do not get enough sleep. Even getting an extra 30 minutes of sleep each night will make a difference.

The typical teenage brain wants to go to bed late and sleep late the following morning, which is usually hard to manage. You may be able to adjust your body clock but it takes time. Suggestions include:

  • Choose a relaxing bedtime routine; for example, have a bath and a hot milky drink before bed.
  • Avoid loud music, homework, computer games or any other activity that gets your mind racing for about an hour before bedtime.
  • Keep your room dark at night. The brain’s sleep–wake cycle is largely set by light received through the eyes. Try to avoid watching television right before bed. In the morning, expose your eyes to lots of light to help wake up your brain.
  • Do the same bedtime routine every night for at least four weeks to make your brain associate this routine with going to sleep.
  • Start your bedtime routine a little earlier than usual (for example, 10 minutes) after four weeks. Do this for one week.
  • Add an extra 10 minutes every week until you have reached your desired bedtime.
  • Avoid staying up late on the weekends. Late nights will undo your hard work.
  • Remember that even 30 minutes of extra sleep each night on a regular basis makes a big difference. However, it may take about six weeks of getting extra sleep before you feel the benefits.

 

Ms Deb Kitak – School Nurse

A survey of 1,000 respondents aged 14-25 by mental health service, ReachOut, shows that a quarter of those surveyed had been the victim of bullying over the last 12 months.  With digital devices present in almost every home, workplace and classroom, cyberbullying is becoming increasingly difficult to address.

Dan Brush of Colin Biggers Paisley Lawyers, said the offense is considered cyber bullying when it involves using the Internet or a phone in a harassing, threatening, or offensive manner. “If these devices are used to spread messages or posts which have the potential to be viewed as offensive and can cause anger, outrage, disgust or humiliation, the penalty can be up to three years in jail,” he said. Another offence includes threats or intimidation, Brush explained.

“Trying to intentionally frighten someone by using any mobile devices, emails, or online posts is considered a criminal offence. The penalty for threatening to kill someone can be up to 10 years in jail,” he pointed out. “If the threat is based on an individual’s race, transgender identity or sexual orientation, the bully may be penalised for up to six months in jail.”

Tim Falinski, consumer director of APAC for anti-virus company, Trend Micro, says better education around digital citizenship as well as the real-life consequences that cyber bullying can have are key to stamping out this problem. “We want the students to feel safe to tell staff if there is something wrong. If you notice cyberbullying occurring in the school, take immediate action and notify the respective parents,”

Doing its part to protect their children from cyber bullying, Trend Micro offers parents an option through its Home Network Security which allows the user to set individual profiles for children, helping to control the devices that they use. “This works by blocking and notifying you on inappropriate websites that they may try to visit, as well as setting time limits to how much time they can spend on the internet,” he said.  “Notifications are available to monitor kids using inappropriate apps on their smartphones and tablets. This includes enterprise grade security to protect all the connected devices in your home from cyber threats.”

Below, Falinski shares some counter-cyber bullying tips for parents:

  • Have an open two way conversation with your children about the risks
  • Try to get your kids to share their profiles and blogs with you
  • Establish some general rules: Set time limits on when they can go online and guidelines on what sites they can and can’t visit
  • Consider requiring Internet use in a high-traffic place in your home
  • Parents should be careful not to react when the kids tell them something bad – otherwise run the risk of scaring them from talking to them next time
  • Invest in a solution that offers parental controls like Home Network Security

Following on from the success of 2016, Speed Careering at Applecross SHS is on again!  Any parents/guardians willing to share their work/career experiences are encouraged to attend.

 

Speed Careering – Presenter information and tips

Applecross SHS Performing Arts Centre

Wednesday 25th October 2017

Session 1 : 8.30-10.30am

Session 2 : 11.15-1.15pm

Why are we doing it?

Many students have limited knowledge of the breadth of career paths available in their community post compulsory schooling. The Speed Careering event focuses on increasing student’s awareness of the career paths available to them by providing opportunities for them to interact with local business representatives.

How will it work?

The event will involve 230 students, conducted over two sessions of approximately 115 students. Each session is broken into two sections, ‘Top Jobs’ and ‘Speed Careering’. During the Top Jobs section, all presenters will have 30 seconds to explain who they are, what they do and why they think their job is a top job.

Students will then be broken into groups of 8-10 and the next section, Speed Careering will begin.

You will be assigned a group and will have 7-8 minutes to speak with the students. Students will have a question sheet to help guide their questioning. When this time is up a bell will ring and students will move to the next table.

Speed Careering is based on a similar format to ‘Speed Dating’, which means that your presentations will be short and sharp.

What is required from me?

The aim of Speed Careering is to expose students to a variety of diverse career paths, some which they may not have considered, in a short time frame.

Some topics you can cover in your session may include (but not limited to):

  • Your career story, what did you want to do when you were in high school and what happened from there?
  • What does your job involve? What does a day/week look like for you?
  • What are the everyday highlights and lowlights of the job?
  • Have you always followed this career path?
  • What have you done before?
  • Did you always see yourself doing this?
  • What have you learnt along the way?
  • What obstacles have you overcome to reach your career?
  • What’s next for you?
  • What other career paths are available in your industry?
  • Would you recommend this career path? If yes, who would it be suitable for?
  • What exciting projects have you worked on?
  • What is the average starting wage and salary range?
  • What has been your career highlight?
  • Are there any travel opportunities with your career or employer?

What should I bring?

Bringing along some equipment related your career can help start conversations and engage students.  Any visual aids/props i.e. examples of your work, equipment used on the job or written information (please be aware we have 230 students participating in this event) can be used.

What should I wear?

Dress as though you are going to work

Further information:

For further information contact Angie Hooton  (angela.hooton@education.wa.edu.au) or 9314 9353 or Rex Ellis on 93149352.

Applecross Senior High School’s House Athletics Carnival will be held on the school oval on Friday 8 September 2017. Please be advised that all Year 7 and 8 students will be attending the Carnival, therefore normal classes will be suspended for these year groups. Students in Year 7 and 8 will be encouraged, but not required, to participate in track and field events. Year 7 and 8 students that choose not to participate in track and field events are expected to participate in some of the novelty events and also be active in supporting their House.

Students in Years 9 to 12 however, are required to nominate through their PE teacher or at the PE Office in order to participate in the Carnival. Please encourage your children to nominate for what promises to be a fun and rewarding day. Year 9 to 12 students that do wish to nominate for the Carnival will be required to participate in at least 3 track and field events on the day (this is to ensure that they maintain an active level of involvement in the Carnival). Year 9 to 12 students that do not nominate for the Carnival will attend normal classes during the day. Year 9 and 10 classes that are scheduled for General Physical Education or PE elective classes will be assigned classrooms to do theory work due to lack of available space and PE teachers.

Students attending the Carnival are encouraged to wear House colours, otherwise PE uniform will be fine. All students participating in the Carnival are advised not to bring valuables or electronic devices on the day to minimise risk of loss. Balls are not to be brought to the carnival as they will form a distraction and potential hazard.  Students are reminded that in line with the school rules relating to mobile phone use during class time, it will not be appropriate for spectators to use their phones during the day.

Recess and lunch breaks have been scheduled as per the usual times. Students are encouraged to bring water on the day in order to avoid needing to leave the oval during the program to access water fountains.   Students are also requested to apply sunscreen

Parents are welcome to attend as spectators and can refer to the schedule below for approximate event times. We look forward to a great Carnival day.

Mr Blaxell - HoLA Health & Physical Education

 

House Athletics Carnival Day Rotations 8 Sept 2017

Rtn

Time

Year 7

Year 9

Year 11

Year 8

Year 10

Year 12

 

8.25am

Roll

Call

 

 

 

 

1

8.40am

800

800

800

Hurdles

Hurdles

Hurdles

2

9.10am

Hurdles

Hurdles

Hurdles

800

800

800

3

9.40am

400

400

400

Long

High

Shot

4

10.10am

Long

High

Shot

400

400

400

 

10.45am

Recess Break

5

11.15am

200

200

200

High

Shot

Long

6

11.45am

High

Shot

Long

200

200

200

7

12.15pm

100

100

100

Shot

Long

High

8

12.45pm

Shot

Long

High

100

100

100

 

1.20pm

Lunch Break

9

1.45pm

Relays

Relays

Relays

Relays

Relays

Relays

10

2.20pm

Tug- of-War   (if time permits)

 

2.30pm

Presentations

 

Year Nine students and Year Eleven Literature and Twelve English students were treated to a high octane performance of poetry on Friday 18August.

A team of three highly talented performers introduced and celebrated the Australian tradition of poetry and the power behind the spoken word in poetic form. The performances were slick and brimming with energy and enthusiasm, drawing from traditional verse, such as bush ballads to fresh and modern monologues with a strong rhythm underlying their delivery.

Poetry is the most intense form of creative writing, containing the richest combination of imagery, sounds and ideas in the smallest genre. The team from Poetry in Action verified that fact and had their audiences completely caught in the web of words they threw over them. I congratulate our students for their excellent behaviour and warm response to the two sessions.

Metaphor rules!

Veronica Lake, HoLA English

Our Year 7 students went to Wireless Hill on Friday, seeing the end of Science/STEAM week.  Murdoch University ambassadors accompanied our students to look at food chains and webs. They all had fun learning about some of our native animals and creating their own arthropod dichotomous keys. 

Some students also had the opportunity to experience what it is like to do quadrat sampling in a bush environment.

To view more photos, please go to our Facebook page.

Upper School Music Showcase: An evening of solo and small group performances by the Year 11 & 12 music students.

Friday 25th August 2017

Concert Commences: 7.00pm

Cost: $10 per ticket

 

Venue:  Applecross SHS Performing Arts Centre (entrance off Ardessie St)

Tickets can be purchased at: https://www.trybooking.com/RLNB

You can sign up to volunteer at the concert via the following link: http://doodle.com/poll/c4bzm7enxzmvi74p

 

Congratulations to Jaime Hunt from Year 10 who was chosen after a very competitive process by UWA Fogarty Scholars to attend a four day Leadership Camp for Year 10 and 11 students in the October School Holidays. Jaime is part of our Year 10 Academic Extension Program in HASS and is looking forward to the chance to further develop her leadership skills. It is really encouraging to see students taking the time to apply for opportunities that present themselves.

Brad Snell, HASS Teacher

Our design and technology students have had the exciting opportunity to use our new digital laser cutter to design and produce some outstanding work.   Attached also are a number of photos of our talented Certificate in Visual Art Woodwork students and the projects they are currently working on.

To view more photos, please go to our Facebook page.

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